Door-to-door fundraising

Door-to-door fundraising is being used more and more frequently by the UK’s charities to obtain regular committed gifts (Direct Debit donations) for their work. If you are visited by a door-to-door fundraiser it’s important to keep you and your personal information safe. Here’s what you need to know.

Door-to-door fundraising is being used more and more frequently by the UK’s charities to obtain regular committed gifts (Direct Debit donations) for their work. If you are visited by a door-to-door fundraiser it’s important to keep you and your personal information safe. Some donors have told us they don’t know what to look for. Here’s what you need to know.

Donating safely at your door

Some people have concerns about door-to-door fundraising but charities do find it an effective way of raising funds. Here’s our advice on how to give safely:

Check the charity information

Genuine fundraising materials should feature the charity’s name, registered number and a landline contact number. Be wary of those that list only a mobile number.

If you want to check the details, you can look up UK registered charities on the Charity Commission’s website. For Scottish charities, check out the OSCR and visit the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland for charities based there.

Check the fundraiser’s ID badge

Genuine fundraisers should be wearing a proper ID badge. It should be properly printed, not photocopied or hand-written.

If in doubt, ask the collector for more information – a genuine fundraiser should be happy to answer questions and explain more about the work of the charity.

Look for the FRSB tick logo

FRSB 'give with confidence' tick logoIf you see the FRSB tick, you know the charity is regulated by the FRSB and has committed to the highest fundraising standards and are regulated. See which charities are members.

How it should be done properly

According to the Code of Practice, fundraisers shouldn’t pressurise the public to give their support, but they can use reasonable persuasion.

If you tell them you’re not interested, the fundraiser should politely stop their approach and leave your property.

Fundraising should normally take place between 9am-9pm on a weekday and 10am-9pm on a weekend.

Know what information you need to give in order to donate

If you do want to support the charity and set up a Direct Debit, you will only need to give your bank account number and sort code. Never give anyone card numbers, PINs or security codes.

If you have concerns about whether it’s legitimate

Contact the charity directly if you’d like to check whether they are collecting in your area. If you have any concerns about giving your bank details at the door, you could contact the charity directly to set up your donation.

What to do if you have concerns

If you’re unhappy about the behaviour of the fundraiser or the information they give out, contact the charity. The fundraiser should be able to provide the information.

If you still have concerns after contacting the charity, you can come to the Fundraising Standards Board. Call us on 0333 321 8803 or email info@frsb.org.uk

You can also make a complaint.

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